Viggo Mortensen

The Road reviewed by Showbiz411

Roger Friedman at Showbiz411 has posted his review of The Road. Here are a few quotes:

Hillcoat has done justice to McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize winner. “The Road” is elegiac and moving, artful and yet suspenseful. No, it’s not a raucous good time. It can be thoughtful and grim. But here’s the interesting thing: Viggo Mortensen’s performance as a father walking through a post-apocalypse America with his young son is just fascinating. It stays with you long after leaving the theater. Mortensen is that good.

There aren’t a lot of other actors in “The Road.” Charlize Theron is very good as Viggo’s wife, in flashbacks. Both Robert Duvall and Guy Pearce make cameo appearances. Eleven-year-old (he’s 13 now) Kodi Smit-McPhee is just right as the couple’s son.

What Hillcoat and screenwriter Joe Penhall do is accurately capture McCarthy’s tone and lauguage. This isn’t easy to do. “The Road” is a bleak trip, told in muted blacks, blues, and grays. There are no blue skies after whatever caused the apocalypse (is it nuclear war? we don’t know. Everything left, including the trees, is dying.)

You can read the full article here.

More about The Road, from Garret

While promoting The Last House on the Left, Garret talked to ShockTillYouDrop and had a few things to say about The Road. Quotes below.

About the November 2008 release date:

“There wasn’t time. I think it was very ambitious for them to think they could get it edited together and out for the Oscar season. I think they realized – and I say this because I have a very small part in it – Viggo and the kid are fantastic, but I think they realized they have a very special thing on their hands. They wanted to do it right, so why not hang onto it?”

About the shoot:

“I only had to be there for a few days and it was exhausting. They have incredible stamina, those two. Viggo’s a horse.”

On the subject of hope in the film:

“[The Road carries] more hope than No Country for Old Men. That film was, ‘Look, this is what the world is today. There’s a new crime out there and if you can’t handle it, you better retire. Go hide in the woods, old man.’ And he does. The Road actually ends quite hopeful. This little boy… there’s a phrase they say, ‘You have to carry the fire.’ The fire means this hope, this belief in goodness, we’re the good guys. That’s what [the father and son] say as they try to live fighting off cannibals and stuff. In the end you feel like it’ll bloom again, man will find a way. It’s heartbreaking and beautiful.” [ShockTillYouDrop.com]

Fox press junket: more about The Road and the Gang Member

Garret was promoting The Sarah Connor Chronicles at Fox’s midseason press junket. The first report is mainly about The Road. It’s up at SCI FI Wire.

“I play the Gang Member, and they meet up with a pretty nasty road gang toward the beginning, in the first quarter,” Dillahunt said in an interview on Tuesday in Los Angeles, where he was promoting Fox’s Sarah Connor Chronicles. “Yeah, in the truck. And me and Viggo have a great scene in the woods where I try to take his son. The big fight in the woods.”

Dillahunt said the film shot in winter in rural Pennsylvania, a bleak setting that mirrored the book’s grim landscape, which Dillahunt described as “beautiful in its spareness.”

“We shot in just horrific places, you know,” Dillahunt said. “We found this incredible stretch of road that hadn’t been used since 1964, outside of Pittsburgh, these incredible tunnels and everything, really spooky, and the trees are bare, freezing cold. And I think they assembled a group of people that’s very interested in preserving the book.” The movie is directed by John Hillcoat and written by Joe Penhall.

Dillahunt—who, unlike many of his characters, is the nicest guy possible—says the role made him wonder how he’d react in similar circumstances. “I like to think I’d be like Viggo’s character or Guy Pearce’s character, you know? I’d like to think that that’s how I’d respond to that crisis. But if I’m starving, I wonder what I would do. I’m pretty certain that it wouldn’t be cannibalism.”

Still, Dillahunt said that he had to get into the mindset of a cannibalistic marauder. “I had more sympathy for the guy when I tried to think of it in those terms,” he said, but added with a smile: “That might have been… too kind.”

Garret on The Road, No Country and Cormac McCarthy

The Road was mentioned in an article at Creators.com today:

The Coen brothers brought the already-popular novelist Cormac McCarthy to the attention of a much bigger share of the mass audience when they turned his book “No Country for Old Men” into an Oscar-winning movie. Now McCarthy’s latest novel, “The Road,” will hit theaters in 2009 with Viggo Mortensen starring. His co-star Garret Dillahunt, who also had the distinction of being in “No Country for Old Men” says fans will be more than pleased with the adaptation. “It’s incredibly faithful to the book and rightfully so. It’s just as faithful to the book as ‘No Country’ was. You can never match the descriptive power of a book, but I think it’s such a beautiful tale,” claims Dillahunt of the story about a father and son who journey together many months after a great, unexplained cataclysm. “I think people are going to be pretty blown away by the thing.”

Dillahunt’s only regret is that he has never met the famous author of the words he has had the pleasure of reciting. “Cormac came on the set of ‘No Country’ and ‘The Road,’ but of course never when I was around, which is a shame because I’m a geek about writers,” he admits. “I seldom get star struck, but when the writer comes around, I get completely tongue-tied. I’m dying to meet him. I think that’s why I work so hard to get in his movies.” [Creators.com]